Is it Legal to Own a Galapagos Tortoise in My State? SEE HERE!

Yes, you can own Galapagos tortoises if they are legal in your area, but only with the necessary permits to keep an endangered species.

The only other thing to do is to check with your state. I believe Georgia does not classify Galapagos as a prohibited animal.

Thus, all that is required is a CBW permit. IF YOU ARE BUYING ONE OUTSIDE OF THE STATE IN WHICH YOU RESIDE.

There are no breeders in Georgia that I am aware of. Your best bet would be to obtain a CBW so that when some babies or adults become available, you can swoop in and seize them. They, like Aldabras, are seed propagators.

Simply discovered on a completely different island and part of the planet. They prefer semi-arid conditions.

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Is it Legal to Own a Galapagos Tortoise

The Galapagos Islands have a truly unique topography. Tropical but arid. Because the entire subterranean area is volcanic rock, it drains extremely well.

In mud pits, they perform Waller. In the wild, they eat primarily cactus and greens. With the occasional consumption of weeds while grazing on grass.

In comparison to the Aldabras, they can be quite territorial. Males and females alike will fight and bite one another. That is something to consider if you are purchasing multiples. However, there is no need to be concerned if you have infants, to begin with.

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Another factor to consider is the sub-species. There are ten distinct subspecies. The majority of those present are becki and vicina. Which species are the largest?

There are also additional animals here at various zoos and breeders. Regrettably, they frequently cross.

Therefore, if you’re serious about breeding them, I’d recommend going through a zoological channel that maintains pure sub species lineages. I can send you some zoo information that utilizes pure lines.

I’m not sure they’d deal with a private individual. Maybe. They are also somewhat pricey. 4-6 thousand dollars for a single baby. They must be kept on a dry rocky landscape with a mud hole in one section and a grassy area with plants to hide beneath in the remainder of the area.

They also grow rather slowly, in comparison to the Aldabras.

My acquaintance is a very successful keeper at a zoo who is extremely intelligent with these guys. They benefit from slow, steady growth. At two years old, they will still weigh between 200 and 300 grams.

However, maintaining a healthy weight is critical for proper bone, muscle, and hip development. I hope this information is beneficial. Without a doubt, they are lovely species.

Should I get an Aldabra Tortoise or a Galapagos one?

Due to the permitting requirements for Galapagos tortoises, the Aldabra is likely to be less expensive.

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They are both, however, in excess of three thousand dollars. (Yes, you can own Galapagos tortoises if they are legal in your area, but only with the necessary permits to keep an endangered species.)

I’ve never heard anyone criticize either of their temperaments. Aldabra hatchlings are more skittish, but they mature into Galapagos-like creatures.

Males, of course, can be dangerous at times — they are capable of delivering more than a bruise if they get into a mood and decide to ram your shins! That is the equivalent of a 300-pound weight being slammed into you.

Never allow yourself to be cornered.

I’ll grant you the benefit of the doubt and assume you’ve already considered how you’re going to provide a controlled indoor environment during the winter and a secure pen during the summer (chain link will not suffice for this bulldozer of an animal!)

, veterinary care, a special diet, and, of course, leaving the animal in your will to be cared for by someone who IS capable of caring for such a beast after you die… It’s akin to owning a Mini that behaves more like a horse than a goat.

Except goats and horses are not diggers; tortoises are. Expensive is an understatement!

can i own a galapagos tortoise

My Thoughts?

I strongly advise against a Galapagos. Much more affordable, though you’re still looking at several thousand dollars for the animal alone. Additionally, an Aldabra does not require a permit.

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Aldabras are a teeny-tiny bit smaller, a teeny-tiny bit more manageable, and a teeny-tiny bit more hardy.

Expect a strong outdoor enclosure during the warm season and a garage enclosure, heated greenhouse, or similar structure during the cold season.

Aldabras are slightly more skittish, but by the time they reach maturity, it’s difficult to tell and they’re usually past that stage.

Both are far from beginner-level, but I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt. Conduct research. They are not as simple to keep as a sulcata, and even those I would not recommend to a novice keeper.

Though some committed beginners may be able to handle them. And keep in mind that this is a lifelong commitment; this tortoise will almost always outlive you and, if you have children, your grandchildren.

For approximately four generations and counting, my family has passed down family tortoises. It’s a pet you must include in your will, and you must carefully consider who will care for it.

Whichever tortoise you choose, an Aldabra or Galapagos tortoise that is properly cared for can be one of the most rewarding pets available in my opinion. I adore our Aldabra princess. However, you will only get what you put in.

Best of luck!

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